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Going Pro
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P68
Reg. Jan 2014
Posted 2014-01-17 11:41 PM (#6919370)
Subject: Going Pro


Regular


Posts: 95
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So I know this will sound crazy but I'm wondering if it's possible to barrel race without a horse? And even more specifically to become a professional this way? Some equestrians just can't afford owning a horse. Let alone lessons and rodeos. I do however, think leasing is an option.

Do you know if anyone has ever made it to the professional level this way? I definitely appreciate any insight back on this, thanks so much! :)
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cowdoc101
Reg. Oct 2010
Posted 2014-01-18 1:17 AM (#6919382 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro



Veteran


Posts: 246
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Location: OK
I think there are quite a few of the top riders who don't actually own their own horses. BUT I think you have to prove yourself as a rider before an owner of that level will let you get on their pony.
If you have breeder/owners in your area that you have a good relationship with I would start there-build contacts and network and see where it goes.
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Thistle2011
Reg. Mar 2012
Posted 2014-01-18 5:46 AM (#6919401 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro



The BHW Book Worm


Posts: 1768
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I agree with above you also need to ask who is going to pay for gas. Feed. Hay. Fees . If you can't afford a horse. I have spend much more than 1000 a month on gas and wasn't even traveling very far.. and on another note fallon Taylor doesn't own baby flo

Edited by Thistle2011 2014-01-18 5:54 AM
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SwishMiss
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2014-01-18 7:31 AM (#6919419 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro


Pig-Bear Dog Lover


20001002525
Who owns her?
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WrapN3MN
Reg. Mar 2008
Posted 2014-01-18 12:39 PM (#6919508 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro





100010010010010025
Jill Moody didn't own Dolly.

In these circumstances (Professional level) I think it is more of a business investment by the owner than just looking to lease out their horse.

Edited by WrapN3MN 2014-01-18 12:40 PM
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cowdoc101
Reg. Oct 2010
Posted 2014-01-18 1:20 PM (#6919522 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro



Veteran


Posts: 246
10010025
Location: OK
I think there are several of the top 15--heck even the top 50 that do not "own" the horses--and I bet there are a myriad of how the winnings and the expenses are divvied up. Would be interesting to know which ones actually own their own (or is owned by their family/family business) and how they work it.
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P68
Reg. Jan 2014
Posted 2014-01-18 5:34 PM (#6919582 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro


Regular


Posts: 95
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These have all been great answers thank you and I agree it would be interesting to know more details about the business arrangements some of the professionals have.

I guess I am just kind of confused because I can see why they are professionals. But from the stories I know it seemed like most of them worked with their own horse starting out, and I was wondering if a rider could do the opposite.

For the hopeful pros, the budget wary, those just starting out -- what's the best insight?

Again maybe a few more crazy ideas but:

Do you all think that yes......it is in fact possible to go pro no matter what? (The pros all do have very diverse backgrounds which I love!) Age, location, background, etc doesn't determine champions

And lastly, and probably really the only question is -- does it really all just come down to hard work, having what it takes, luck or just the right opportunity?

Any and all other thoughts/opinions welcome!
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barn goddess
Reg. Jun 2006
Posted 2014-01-18 9:02 PM (#6919653 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro


Super Woman


Posts: 1359
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Fallon bred Baby Flo. Her mom and dad is who owned the mare and stallion. I thought last time I saw breeder and owner posted for her it had Fallon and her moms name.
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goldcard
Reg. Sep 2006
Posted 2014-01-24 6:14 PM (#6923978 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro



Elite Veteran


Posts: 832
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Location: Kansas (but Great Lakes member since 1978)
Anyone can buy a WPRA permit and take a crack at becoming a card holder. Professional barrel racing is a TOUGH GAME and not for the faint of heart and it is expensive. Fuel is your main expense and there have been months where I've put over $3000 in my fuel tank. If you are willing to work hard and learn the "ropes" of running a barrel horse in any condition and have the right horse you can make it. Just like the others have mentioned…. a lot of barrel racers ride horses they don't own but they are very experienced and the people that own those top horses want them out there so they seek the great riders. You never know though because there are also a lot of great horses that didn't cost much money and were in the hands of good riders that were just starting out and they "clicked"… Don't give up your dream because it seems like an impossible one…. just work hard and seek opportunities and you just may realize that dream.
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farmer's tan
Reg. Dec 2012
Posted 2014-01-27 10:37 PM (#6925662 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro




10025
With regard to the NFR qualifiers who own or just ride the horses, barrelracingreport.com had a good article with their breeding lines, the breeder and the owners listed )look in the little shaded boxes.
http://www.barrelracingreport.com/issues/12_3_13_BarrelRacingReport...
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P68
Reg. Jan 2014
Posted 2014-01-30 11:04 PM (#6928039 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro


Regular


Posts: 95
252525
That barrel racing report is great. I didn't realize Sherry doesn't technically own Stingray.

So there were a few young teens (~19) that made the nfr this year, and yet there are riders who will spend their whole life competing and never get to the nfr...What's making the difference -- is it talent, rich families, or something else I'm failing to see?
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farmer's tan
Reg. Dec 2012
Posted 2014-02-06 11:32 PM (#6932532 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro




10025
I know I have heard over and over again, you MUST have at least some money to do it. Diesel alone could break a person. There are so many riders with talent that may never crack the top 15 or the top 50 even. I think it's a combination of talent, the right horse at the right time, money to get you started, entering the right races etc. so much! I think it will be really interesting to see how the American plays out since they will have non-top WNFR racers against those who don't or haven't qualified. I was also surprised by how many don't actually own their own horses--I was always curious about that and was glad to see the barrel racing report information.
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ponderosa32
Reg. Jan 2013
Posted 2014-04-01 6:18 PM (#6968857 - in reply to #6919370)
Subject: RE: Going Pro


boon


Posts: 3
0
Being around rodeo a good part of my life, from junior rodeo to pro rodeo. I think it really depends on the horse and rider chemistry. Money plays a part in getting to the rodeo and finding that equestrian partner. However it does not guarantee that you will win or even place. There are a lot of girls who show up with a nice truck, trailer and a horse that costs $20,000 plus and still don't clock in the top twenty at a rodeo. Then sometimes there will be a girl who can show up in a two horse trailer and a wild card horse and whip them all. I also see a recipe in owning the horse from a young age. So it is a lot of variables coming together. I think starting at barrel races, amateur rodeos, and then if your doing good there, then consider going pro.
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