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Sticky Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon
Gail
Reg. Sep 2003
Posted 2011-09-02 7:59 AM
Subject: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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rachellyn80
Reg. Jan 2004
Posted 2011-09-02 10:52 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



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Fantastic! 


Lianna-
I would love to know what some of your favorite maneuvers and tune-up exercises are for a horse that is super turny and has a tendency to crash on his front end.

Greg has been helping me so much, but everyone has their go to daily exercises for horses with these kinds of issues.
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teeally
Reg. Apr 2004
Posted 2011-09-03 12:17 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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I have a colt that is prominately right leaded, very hard to get him in his left.. any suggestions??  thanks:
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ridejg
Reg. Jan 2009
Posted 2011-09-03 11:27 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon





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 Hi Lianna..I am sure if you would put out your own dvd it would be a great success..
How often do you work a young horse on the pattern on a weekly basis?
Thankyou..

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Richard Degnan
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-09-05 3:24 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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Hi Lianna, We have a horse that is super nervous when it is time to run.  This horse rides quiet and has been ridden a lot outside. It is just when it is time to enter the arena. This horse is not the least bit baulky and was this anxious the 2nd time he was run. Has never  been run twice in a row. Just wild to start.  Thanks
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Happymom
Reg. Apr 2009
Posted 2011-09-05 10:00 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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What kind of exercises would you recommend for a mare that is super ratey on all the barrels? 

Thanks!
Happymom
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rodeolife
Reg. Dec 2009
Posted 2011-09-06 8:58 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon




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hi Lianna, I would love to know what your feed/supplement program is for the horses you are competing on. I have a 9yr old mare who is turned out in a pasture with some grass all day and put in a stall at night. she is ridden nearly every day and run at least once most weekends. ive pulled her off all supplements and only giving her hay/grain because I havent found a supplement I thought was worth the money. thank you!!  
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haydawgg
Reg. May 2011
Posted 2011-09-06 5:48 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



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Hey Lianna!
Have you ever had a young horse that seemed to go nuts over anything repetitive? I mean like you do three circles one way and they start going side ways and start rearing, bucking, etc.? What do I do for this? He will do everything perfectly as long as you only make him do it ONCE. I guess its hard to understand unless you see it.

(FYI; All pain issues are ruled out by vet, equine dentist, and chiro.)
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DG19
Reg. Apr 2006
Posted 2011-09-07 6:08 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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First a big THANK YOU


The tools you put in place have helped me and Ginger tremendously!!! A ton more confidence.

My question

What exercises do you like while riding outside? especially for young horses.

Thanks again
Darlene
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Wishful
Reg. Nov 2010
Posted 2011-09-07 7:56 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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Hi, Do you have any exercises for horse that loses his rearend on the backside of the 2nd barrel as you are coming out of the turn? He goes into it great..but kinda stutters/hesitates and doesnt come back to you when you pick up on him....
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countrygirl2006
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-09-07 9:01 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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Thanks for joining us, Lianna.

What basics do you like having on a young horse before starting them on the pattern?  

How do you gauge when a younger horse is ready to be pushed harder on the pattern?

Do you have a certain way you introduce them to more speed on the pattern?



Thanks again!
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BACK TO THE BASICS
Reg. May 2011
Posted 2011-09-07 11:27 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon




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Hi Liana,

With winter around the corner....how do you keep your young ones going thru the winter? Especially the ones that need to be consistanly rode / ones that really need miles put on. Kinda hard to do much on one...between the weather, mud, and frozen ground....especially if you have one that you would like to lunge a little bit before getting on. Any tips or exercises when you don't have access to an indoor for the winter?
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:46 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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Hi everyone !! Thanks for having me back !! I'll be posting answers to the current questions and some emailed questions, then I'll be happy to take follow ups or more questions.

I look forward to hearing from you !

Liana DeWeese
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:48 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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rachellyn80 - 2011-09-02 10:52 AM

Fantastic! 


Lianna-
I would love to know what some of your favorite maneuvers and tune-up exercises are for a horse that is super turny and has a tendency to crash on his front end.

Greg has been helping me so much, but everyone has their go to daily exercises for horses with these kinds of issues.

This is where the counter arc comes in very handy. I will describe the mechanics of the Counter Arc, even though you probably already know them. We will use a counter arc to the left as an example: Walk in a circle to the left, tip your horses nose to the right, bend his ribs inward creating his body arc to the right, but remember , you are walking to the left.
A lot of people think a counter arc is moving in a circle with your horse's nose tipped to the outside, but that's not correct. A horse should move laterally, away from your leg and rein, while maintaining forward motion in the circle. The more advanced you and your horse are, the smaller the diameter of the counter arc.
If your horse is totally new to this he will need to know how to travel down the fence with his nose tipped to the inside without drifting/pulling inward. To keep him from drifting, put your leg against the inside cinch area to block him from coming in. ***The horse knowing how to side pass well will make this exercise easier. Try for a few correct steps and build on that until he does it easily. When he side pass and do the fence exercise, you're ready to try a counter arc.
When starting to counter arc a horse that hasn't done it, do only a few correct steps where you feel him arced to the outside of the circle and moving off of your leg and build on that. Don't try to do a complete circle the first time. Trotting is usually a good speed to start at, that way you have good forward motion. Eventually, your horse should be able to do a small counter arc correctly at a lope or even a fast lope.

Anyway, back to the tune up.
When you get to the point at the barrel where your horse drops, pick his inside shoulder up and counter arc him around in a full circle, ending up at the point you started, then continue the turn. So if your horse tries to drop in right at the rate point going into the turn, that's where you'd pick him up and do the counter arc. You can try it at a slow lope or trot. When you get more confident and you've got an older horse more set in his ways, you can do it at a faster pace, even a run. Done correctly, it will get him a lot more responsive to your rein. Currently, he is pushing against your rein and leg. The exercise gets him to "honor" your rein and leg so that when you lift up he moves over instead of pushing.
This exercise is also good for a horse that wants to not be round on the back side of the barrel. Just pick him up and counter arc him at the point he is stiffening and dropping.

The exercise for Happymom is also a good one for the problem your addressing.

**Please tell Gregg congrats on the Puncher Class win at the OKC Ranch Horse Competition !! I was supposed to judge it, but had to be at Fulton's sale....RATS !!!
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:49 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
ridejg - 2011-09-03 11:27 AM

 Hi Lianna..I am sure if you would put out your own dvd it would be a great success..
How often do you work a young horse on the pattern on a weekly basis?
Thankyou..


It really depends on the individual and what it takes to keep him sharp. In my program, it's not so much how much time is spent on the pattern, but how correct the horse is when he is on the pattern. This is a good saying in the industry that I truly believe: "When you are on/around your horse, you are either "training" or "un-training" . Those are the only two choices. Many people will say, "I'm not a trainer"....I say everyone is a trainer.
I usually work a horse on the pattern 3/4 days per wk. On that note, I very rarely spend over a few minutes on the pattern. As soon as that horse shows me that he's trying to work, being correct and making a tiny bit of progress, I quit and go out into the pasture to work on suppleness. There also needs to be a time where I don't ask him for anything at all, just to ride thru some trees, around some rocks, thru the cattle or something. It's like you walking out of your office to get some fresh air. I am looking for the horse to stay correct, on his own. When I say "correct", I mean proper body position and proper placement around the barrel. I will allow him to make a mistake, but I will correct him immediately. This applies to any speed the horse is working.
Many people want to micro-mange a horse. This is very frustrating to the horse and it's a lot of work for the rider. If you will let him work on his own, at whatever stage he's at, but be there if he needs correction, both parties will be better off.
I would also rather concentrate on components of the pattern like circles, stops, collection, lateral flexion away from the pattern. I might work around a bush or tree or thru trees to get my horse guiding better. This is all done at varying speeds and most of it can be done anywhere you've got safe ground. Basically, you are separating the different parts of the pattern, then recombining them when you make a run. To me the barrel pattern itself, is just that, a pattern. My horse is going to be able to do anything with the proper foundation, it just so happens the barrel pattern is what I work on the most.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:50 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
Richard Degnan - 2011-09-05 3:24 AM

Hi Lianna, We have a horse that is super nervous when it is time to run.  This horse rides quiet and has been ridden a lot outside. It is just when it is time to enter the arena. This horse is not the least bit baulky and was this anxious the 2nd time he was run. Has never  been run twice in a row. Just wild to start.  Thanks

First of all, make sure you are not getting anxious yourself. If he's a super sensitive horse he may be picking up on your body language.
I'm sure you realize some horses are going to be more excited to go in the arena than others. As long as they are manageable and I can handle them, that's fine with me. Not every horse needs to walk into the arena totally flat footed with his head down. Your word was "anxious", so, if I understand you correctly, this horse is past nervous and you are wanting him to be quieter ??
By the way you describe him, maybe it's just the loud speaker and the activity that is bothering him. If this is the case, I would make sure I hauled him to more jackpots and just loped circles in back and worked him near the activity until he quieted down. Just let him get used to everything before you even ask him to go thru the pattern.

I would find a jackpot that had plenty of room near the alleyway. I would be sure to keep his feet moving forward, backward, left and right until I felt him start to relax. To explain more, I would ask him to do small circles (like 10 ft wide or smaller), reverse directions frequently, roll him back over his hocks, flex him laterally, side pass him, just keep him busy. If he is wanting to be speedy about things, keep the circles smaller until he settles down. **Be sure to keep him soft while doing all this, don't let him push on the bit, concentrate on softness and bending. Be sure to mix it up, don't stick on one thing for more than a minute or so. When you feel him start to relax a little walk him up the alleyway and let him sit and relax. You may have to find the right time during exhibitions or during a drag to do this. Stick with it for as long as it takes to feel him relax. You may have to repeat this process several times, but the time it takes to settle him down should diminish each time. I wouldn't worry about making a run or even going thru the pattern until he starts to settle down.

If you work on this with absolutely no results you may be dealing with a pain issue.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:52 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
Happymom - 2011-09-05 10:00 AM

What kind of exercises would you recommend for a mare that is super ratey on all the barrels? 

Thanks!
Happymom

The counter arc exercise I described to Rachellyn80 is very helpful and the following:

Big circles and small circles:
You can do this at a trot first, then when you get the hang of it, go to a lope. You can even do this at a fast lope.
Go to the first barrel and do a normal to slightly oversize turn. Instead of proceeding to the 2nd barrel, go right back into an extra big circle around the first barrel (about 20 - 30 wide). Your horse will probably want to cheat and step in. Be firm and don't let him cheat, keeping him in the big circle all the way around the barrel. If you feel him trying to step in put your inside rein and leg against him to correct him and put him back to the right spot.
Continue in the big circle. When you get back to where you would normally go to the second barrel, go back into the normal size turn.
Repeat the process until you feel him staying in the big circle easily and honoring your rein. **Be sure it is a symmetrical circle. Don't let him step in at the rate point making it an egg shape, make sure that he does what you're asking. If you're not good at judging equal distance in the big circle, put some kind of marker at 3 or 4 spots as guides (cones, tires, etc.).

When you have the process down at the first barrel, repeat the same process at the 2nd and 3rd barrel.

Be sure to go on to the next barrel as soon as your horse is correct. Don't keep repeating the exercise when he's already done it correctly.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:53 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
teeally - 2011-09-03 12:17 AM

I have a colt that is prominately right leaded, very hard to get him in his left.. any suggestions??  thanks:

Hey girl ! thanks for the question !
the lead originates from the hind end, so I would get him moving down the fence with his hind end to the inside of the arena. For a left lead, you're going to go to the left down the fence with his left hip to the inside of the arena. Your horse should be able to side pass each way easily before you start this exercise. Trot down the fence, as you get near the end of the arena bump him on his right side and ask him to lope as you make the turn at the end of the arena. Don't worry about having his nose tipped to the inside of the circle until he takes the lead easily. Once he's in the correct lead let him stay in it for awhile without asking for anything else. His reward for him being correct is for you to not ask him for anything else.

Another option is the "Make the wrong thing hard and the right thing easy" method:

If the above process doesn't work, you can "counter canter" him for awhile and make it uncomfortable for him. Counter cantering is basically loping on the wrong lead in a circle. So if you were loping to your left, you would be in the right lead. Let him lope on the wrong lead in a fairly small circle for a while then slow to a trot and give him the opportunity to pick up the correct lead. Repeat the process until he makes the decision to pick up the correct lead.
If you still have problems after using the two above methods you may be dealing with a soreness issue.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:54 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
rodeolife - 2011-09-06 8:58 AM

hi Lianna, I would love to know what your feed/supplement program is for the horses you are competing on. I have a 9yr old mare who is turned out in a pasture with some grass all day and put in a stall at night. she is ridden nearly every day and run at least once most weekends. ive pulled her off all supplements and only giving her hay/grain because I havent found a supplement I thought was worth the money. thank you!!  

I feed high quality Bermuda hay along with a custom made feed that I buy in bulk. I try to keep hay in front of my horses as much as possible. I will feed a small amount of alfalfa hay to horses that are transitioning. The feed I have made is oats, corn and alfalfa pellets, no molasses, along with a soy blend oil and a fat/vitamin supplement pellet. They also have access to loose salt. Horses are not designed to lick a hard salt block and get what they need, so I use the loose stock salt.

I don't feed a lot of supplements. I have tried several oral joint supplements and never see one that I thought made a difference. I do use Dynamite Plus pellets if I think a horse needs a little something extra, or maybe a horse that was not in great health when he got here. I have used Dynamite Plus (it has probiotic in it and is a milder version of regular Dynamite) for many years and haven't found anything better.
I am currently testing a vit/min/digestive supplement that has more digestive aids in it than Dyn. but I'm still in the testing phase.
I have had horses sent here with several supplements ...to the point that they were being fed a toxic level of some vit./min.
In summary, I think over all good health is most important. Good hay, grain in moderation, green grass and turn out, if possible. Assuring good health also means, float teeth, if needed, ck for ulcers, treat with UlcerGard if needed, worm if needed, make sure the horse is not sore anywhere and has proper shoeing. If the horse is not in good physical condition, start a conditioning program to leg him up.

There is no mistaking a healthy horse, he shows it not only in his coat and condition, but in his eyes.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:55 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
haydawgg - 2011-09-06 5:48 PM

Hey Lianna!
Have you ever had a young horse that seemed to go nuts over anything repetitive? I mean like you do three circles one way and they start going side ways and start rearing, bucking, etc.? What do I do for this? He will do everything perfectly as long as you only make him do it ONCE. I guess its hard to understand unless you see it.

(FYI; All pain issues are ruled out by vet, equine dentist, and chiro.)

There has got to be a reason for his bad behavior. Horses do not expend that amount of energy (bucking, rearing, etc) without a good reason for it.

You said everything repetitive...like backing ? sidepassing ?

Is it loping any size circle, like 60 ft wide..80 ft wide ?

Is it circles both directions or one direction in particular?

Is it happening by the barn ? Is he barn sour or buddying up to another horse?

How old is he and what's his history ?

If you'll give me more information, I'll try to help you out.

If you will send me a video I will be happy to look at it and give an opinion.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:55 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
DG19 - 2011-09-07 6:08 AM

First a big THANK YOU


The tools you put in place have helped me and Ginger tremendously!!! A ton more confidence.

My question

What exercises do you like while riding outside? especially for young horses.

Thanks again
Darlene

Hey Girl !!

Glad to hear Ginger is better!
For riding a horse outside, especially a young horse, I want to give them something to do. If you don't have access to cattle, I would ride thru trees bending around them, doing spirals, switching directions, moving out and back from them laterally. You can do the same thing with bushes, or rocks, use just about anything for a target.
We have quite a few rocks around her, so I love to have my horse pick his way thru the rocks. If you have down logs, you can ride over them, side pass over them, etc.
I just try to incorporate my bending and softening into the surroundings.
Keep in mind, the straighter line you're going in, the faster your horse will want to go.
The name of the game is give her a job, keep her feet busy, moving backward, forward, left and right. The more you do that, the less time she has to go back to using the right side (reactive) of her brain.
**One of the most common mistakes people make in the arena, or outside, is looking for things that the horse might spook at. This is totally opposite of what you should do. Ride with confidence, ignore potential problem areas and keep your horse on his job. The more things you give him to do, the less he will be concerned with the spooky stuff.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:56 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
Wishful - 2011-09-07 7:56 AM

Hi, Do you have any exercises for horse that loses his rearend on the backside of the 2nd barrel as you are coming out of the turn? He goes into it great..but kinda stutters/hesitates and doesnt come back to you when you pick up on him....

1. I need to make sure that your approach into the barrel is correct. Are you giving a proper pocket going into the barrel ?
2. Is your horse dropping his shoulder going into the turn?

1 and 2 are the main reasons horses get out of position on the back side of the turn, it's improper position going into the turn.

If he's dropping his shoulder/cutting off his pocket, please refer to the counter arc exercise I gave Rachellyn80.

If you feel like your approach and horse's body position is correct, please refer to the Big and Small circles exercise I gave to Happymom.
Done correctly, the big and small circles help a horse position his body correctly to leave the turn. When you go from turning the barrel right back into another circle, and don't let him drift out, he has to get his body into the right position.

Another exercise you can do is, say for instance at the second barrel:
Do a regular to slightly larger turn around the barrel, finish the turn, but instead of going onto the third barrel, go STRAIGHT above the 2nd barrel about 15 -20 feet and lope a couple circles. That means you would be loping the extra circles about 20' to the right of the 2nd barrel (assuming you go to the right barrel for your first turn). If you're working on the third barrel, the place your would do the extra circles is 20 feet to the right of the third barrel. On the first barrel (right) you would do extra circles 20' above the first barrel, so that you make your turn and head more towards the third barrel than towards the 2nd like you would in a normal pattern. This exercise exaggerates finishing the turn. It's also good for a horse that wants to rush out of the turn before he finishes turning the barrel. You can do the exercise at a trot until you get your timing down, then lope. Fast lope, if needed, to reinforce the move.
**Also good for a rider that tends to not finish the turn before leaving.

Lastly, if he absolutely won't finish correctly after consistent slow work, ck for soreness.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:56 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
countrygirl2006 - 2011-09-07 9:01 AM

Thanks for joining us, Lianna.

What basics do you like having on a young horse before starting them on the pattern?  

How do you gauge when a younger horse is ready to be pushed harder on the pattern?

Do you have a certain way you introduce them to more speed on the pattern?



Thanks again!

I want all the basics on a horse before I go to the pattern. That includes:
Lateral flexion
shoulder control, ex. counter arcs and two tracking
side passing
backing
stopping
softness in the bridle
maintain proper body position is varying sizes of circles
total control, from head to tail
The horse should be light and responsive for all of this.
Usually it takes about 90 days to put the basics on one, sometimes less, depending on the individual.
When my horse has the proper basics, usually the first time he goes thru the pattern, he can lope thru correctly.

As far as when to increase speed:
The horse is only worked at the speed that he can be correct at. That means his nose is slightly tipped to the inside of turn, he maintaining a symmetrical circle around the barrel with his hip in. Most horses will increase speed on their own as they understand and gain the strength to work correctly. I can't stress enough to be CORRECT every time you work on the pattern.
*I also want to give the horse the chance to maintain correct position on his own. That means when he's correct, I'll give him some rein back and let him learn to hold correct position on his own. I'm not there to "carry" him around the barrel every time, just to correct him if he strays from correctness.
**I might add that as far as speed, there are vary degrees in each gait: Trot, fast trot, lope, faster lope, etc., not just trot, lope, run.
As far as "pushing harder", please refer to my response to Ridejg.
I don't necessarily believe in pushing harder, rather, asking for a tiny bit of improvement each days. Horses, like people, vary in what they can give you, some are ambitious and really try. Some are not so ambitious, you don't get as much effort/progress, but they still make improvements. Different bloodlines handle different amounts of pressure better. The main thing is don't work your horse til he quits trying. Quit asking while he's doing things right. It maybe the first time you go thru, but reward him by backing off.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:58 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
BACK TO THE BASICS - 2011-09-07 11:27 AM

Hi Liana,

With winter around the corner....how do you keep your young ones going thru the winter? Especially the ones that need to be consistanly rode / ones that really need miles put on. Kinda hard to do much on one...between the weather, mud, and frozen ground....especially if you have one that you would like to lunge a little bit before getting on. Any tips or exercises when you don't have access to an indoor for the winter?



I am blessed to have a covered roundpen and an Equiciser with good ground and good drainage. There have been times, like this past winter, where I was limited to just a small space in the roundpen where the snow hadn't blown in !!

The most important thing I can tell you is make sure you ride "effectively vs. ineffectively". That means make every minute count that you're on your horse. Keep him soft, supple and responsive. Do lots of bending and softening. A lot of lateral movements are quite strenuous for a horse, so that definitely helps on the fitness side.
I don't believe in actual "lunging", but I do certainly believe in working a horse around me on a 12-14ft rope with a rope halter. I don't want to lunge him in mindless/endless circles. Not only is it boring, usually it makes him tougher.
When I work a horse on the ground I use the same principal as if I were on him. I want him to give his nose, ribs and hind and, paying attention to me and being soft. Just disengaging a horse's hind end is good exercise for him on it's own. As far as circling around you, I don't do more than 3 circles before I ask the horse to roll back to the inside and reverse directions. If he's acting fresh, I will do fewer circles before I switch directions and ask him to do more things (keep him busier) until I see him start to pay attention.
I know not everyone on here is a Parelli fan but just using his seven games to get your horse more responsive is very helpful.
Ground work, done correctly, is a tremendous tool. It's also great exercise for the rider as well !!

All I can say is, utilize the time and space you have. Keep it interesting for you and your horse. It's not so much the amount of time and mileage, but what you do with it.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 11:58 AM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
A friend of mine told me you have a good thrush treatment, can you give it to me ?

The only way to truly get rid of thrush is for the foot to outgrow it. That means that you've got to make sure the grooves on the side of the frog and especially at the top of the frog don't overlap the sole.
Soak the foot once per day in a Tea Tree Oil wash. Here's the one I use:
healing-tree.com Tea-Clenz Wash
Scrub off the debris and gooey stuff with a brush.
Dry the foot off and apply a mix of 50/50 triple antibiotic ointment and athletes foot cream. You can mix it and put it in a syringe, then just squirt it in. For severe cases, use the above treatment everyday for one wk, then go to every other day.
After the foot starts to heal where you don't see a lot of the black, gooey stuff, just clean the foot and squirt the antibiotic in every other day.
Proper foot trimming/shoeing is critical.
I have seen a lot of horses that have chronic thrush that have other foot issues going on. Usually they have "stacked" (high/tall) heels and heel pain that cause them not to stride right on their feet, thus creating a great environment for thrush.

Edited by Liana D 2011-09-07 12:13 PM
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 12:19 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
How wide of a pocket and how much do you rate your horse?

That depends on several factors:

Pocket and rate depend on how big the horse is, how responsive, how long/short strided, what's his confidence level, what's the ground like? is it slick, which would require a little extra rate. Is it deep? which means I run him up closer.
there are many factors you need to address before you come up with a formula and it will change from pattern to pattern.
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rachellyn80
Reg. Jan 2004
Posted 2011-09-07 12:34 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Jr. Detective


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Location: Beggs, OK
Liana D - 2011-09-07 11:48 AM
rachellyn80 - 2011-09-02 10:52 AM Fantastic! 





Lianna-

I would love to know what some of your favorite maneuvers and tune-up exercises are for a horse that is super turny and has a tendency to crash on his front end.



Greg has been helping me so much, but everyone has their go to daily exercises for horses with these kinds of issues.
This is where the counter arc comes in very handy. I will describe the mechanics of the Counter Arc, even though you probably already know them. We will use a counter arc to the left as an example: Walk in a circle to the left, tip your horses nose to the right, bend his ribs inward creating his body arc to the right, but remember , you are walking to the left. A lot of people think a counter arc is moving in a circle with your horse's nose tipped to the outside, but that's not correct. A horse should move laterally, away from your leg and rein, while maintaining forward motion in the circle. The more advanced you and your horse are, the smaller the diameter of the counter arc. If your horse is totally new to this he will need to know how to travel down the fence with his nose tipped to the inside without drifting/pulling inward. To keep him from drifting, put your leg against the inside cinch area to block him from coming in. ***The horse knowing how to side pass well will make this exercise easier. Try for a few correct steps and build on that until he does it easily. When he side pass and do the fence exercise, you're ready to try a counter arc. When starting to counter arc a horse that hasn't done it, do only a few correct steps where you feel him arced to the outside of the circle and moving off of your leg and build on that. Don't try to do a complete circle the first time. Trotting is usually a good speed to start at, that way you have good forward motion. Eventually, your horse should be able to do a small counter arc correctly at a lope or even a fast lope. Anyway, back to the tune up. When you get to the point at the barrel where your horse drops, pick his inside shoulder up and counter arc him around in a full circle, ending up at the point you started, then continue the turn. So if your horse tries to drop in right at the rate point going into the turn, that's where you'd pick him up and do the counter arc. You can try it at a slow lope or trot. When you get more confident and you've got an older horse more set in his ways, you can do it at a faster pace, even a run. Done correctly, it will get him a lot more responsive to your rein. Currently, he is pushing against your rein and leg. The exercise gets him to "honor" your rein and leg so that when you lift up he moves over instead of pushing. This exercise is also good for a horse that wants to not be round on the back side of the barrel. Just pick him up and counter arc him at the point he is stiffening and dropping. The exercise for Happymom is also a good one for the problem your addressing. **Please tell Gregg congrats on the Puncher Class win at the OKC Ranch Horse Competition !! I was supposed to judge it, but had to be at Fulton's sale....RATS !!!

Thank You so much!

I send Greg your congratulations

He was telling me almost exactly what you just said last night when I was working Denali   I won't tell him that part though! 
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 12:39 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
rachellyn80

YOUR WELCOME !!
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countrygirl2006
Reg. Jun 2005
Posted 2011-09-07 12:48 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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Liana D - 2011-09-07 11:56 AM
countrygirl2006 - 2011-09-07 9:01 AM Thanks for joining us, Lianna.



What basics do you like having on a young horse before starting them on the pattern?  



How do you gauge when a younger horse is ready to be pushed harder on the pattern?



Do you have a certain way you introduce them to more speed on the pattern?







Thanks again!
I want all the basics on a horse before I go to the pattern. That includes: Lateral flexion shoulder control, ex. counter arcs and two tracking side passing backing stopping softness in the bridle maintain proper body position is varying sizes of circles total control, from head to tail The horse should be light and responsive for all of this. Usually it takes about 90 days to put the basics on one, sometimes less, depending on the individual. When my horse has the proper basics, usually the first time he goes thru the pattern, he can lope thru correctly. As far as when to increase speed: The horse is only worked at the speed that he can be correct at. That means his nose is slightly tipped to the inside of turn, he maintaining a symmetrical circle around the barrel with his hip in. Most horses will increase speed on their own as they understand and gain the strength to work correctly. I can't stress enough to be CORRECT every time you work on the pattern. *I also want to give the horse the chance to maintain correct position on his own. That means when he's correct, I'll give him some rein back and let him learn to hold correct position on his own. I'm not there to "carry" him around the barrel every time, just to correct him if he strays from correctness. **I might add that as far as speed, there are vary degrees in each gait: Trot, fast trot, lope, faster lope, etc., not just trot, lope, run. As far as "pushing harder", please refer to my response to Ridejg. I don't necessarily believe in pushing harder, rather, asking for a tiny bit of improvement each days. Horses, like people, vary in what they can give you, some are ambitious and really try. Some are not so ambitious, you don't get as much effort/progress, but they still make improvements. Different bloodlines handle different amounts of pressure better. The main thing is don't work your horse til he quits trying. Quit asking while he's doing things right. It maybe the first time you go thru, but reward him by backing off.

Thanks for the response! That definitely makes sense.
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 12:52 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
you're very welcome !
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SKM
Reg. Dec 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 12:56 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Saint Stacey


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Are you up for a video critique or do you not have time?  Thanks! 
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 12:57 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
SKM - 2011-09-07 12:56 PM

Are you up for a video critique or do you not have time?  Thanks! 

Sure !! Bring it !!
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SKM
Reg. Dec 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 12:59 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Saint Stacey


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She is 4 and has maybe 20 runs on her.  We have her entered in OK City in Dec. and need to smooth things out.
Anything you see and can comment on would be appreciated! Thank you!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mXIMfF3-18

 
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 1:09 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
SKM - 2011-09-07 12:59 PM

She is 4 and has maybe 20 runs on her.  We have her entered in OK City in Dec. and need to smooth things out.
Anything you see and can comment on would be appreciated! Thank you!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mXIMfF3-18

 

She looks nice !

I would worry about smoothness and correctness instead of speed. I think your rider is worrying a little too much about speed.
I would do lots of slow work, working on correctness of the turns, smoothing them out, getting the mare to relax.

I see her lifting her head fighting the bit some. I would work on some big/fast, small/slow cirlces, keeping her soft, letting her know she doesn't have to stiffen up whenever speed is added. It is totally true that the faster you go the more you tend to lose softness, so that is something I constantly work on.
You can also do my circle exercise (see earlier posts) with a fast lope in the big circle and a slow lope in the small cirlce. That technique will teach a horse to maintain proper body position in the turn, while teaching them rate and keeping them smooth all at the same time.
I also see the mare chopping off her pocket, even to the first barrel. This puts her in a bind at the back side, especially at the second barrel, you see her bunch up and have to re-group. I would be working her in symmetrical cirlces around the barrel, maybe even do some counter bends, or at least move her laterally away right at the point where she is stepping in. She has so much try, she's making it tough on herself.

I'll say it again, to your talented little rider "SMOOTH AND CORRECT" !!

you definitely have a nice horse !!

Edited by Liana D 2011-09-07 1:14 PM
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SKM
Reg. Dec 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 1:12 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Saint Stacey


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Thank you so much!  I will have my daughter read this.  I appreciate your help and what you said makes a lot of sense.   

The filly doesn't like much on her head.  What she is in now is a little sidepull/hackmore with short shanks. She has been tough to figure out when it comes to head gear.


Edited by SKM 2011-09-07 1:14 PM
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On the Money Girl
Reg. Aug 2006
Posted 2011-09-07 1:12 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



What About Beer?


Posts: 2412
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Location: So. Cali
Hi


I am trying to train my younger horse to soften up... What bit do you use to do this? Do you use draw reins as well?  
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 1:17 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
On the Money Girl - 2011-09-07 1:12 PM

Hi


I am trying to train my younger horse to soften up... What bit do you use to do this? Do you use draw reins as well?  

I use o ring snaffles (mainly Don Dodge fixed rings) most of the time, all of the time when teaching softening concepts.
I very rarely use draw reins. Horses are taught to soften off of my hands both vertically and laterally. It is a slow process.
You have to be very consistent in what you are asking for. There are some very good videos out that you can rent from Giddyupflix if you're not sure about how to go about it.
The main thing is consistency, patience, and repetition.
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On the Money Girl
Reg. Aug 2006
Posted 2011-09-07 1:19 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



What About Beer?


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Location: So. Cali
Liana D - 2011-09-07 11:17 AM
On the Money Girl - 2011-09-07 1:12 PM Hi





I am trying to train my younger horse to soften up... What bit do you use to do this? Do you use draw reins as well?  
I use o ring snaffles (mainly Don Dodge fixed rings) most of the time, all of the time when teaching softening concepts. I very rarely use draw reins. Horses are taught to soften off of my hands both vertically and laterally. It is a slow process. You have to be very consistent in what you are asking for. There are some very good videos out that you can rent from Giddyupflix if you're not sure about how to go about it. The main thing is consistency, patience, and repetition.

Thanks!  
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 1:20 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
SKM - 2011-09-07 1:12 PM

Thank you so much!  I will have my daughter read this.  I appreciate your help and what you said makes a lot of sense.   

The filly doesn't like much on her head.  What she is in now is a little sidepull/hackmore with short shanks. She has been tough to figure out when it comes to head gear.

Yes, I was guessing she was probably sensitive in the mouth. I think having a lot of forward motion is adding to the problem too.
All I can suggest is lots of quiet time, getting her to relax and give to the bit, especially laterally. I would really work on bending her and softening right before I went in the arena. Try to make it a cue for her to relax. The more you convince her to relax in her neck and jaw, the softer she'll be.

Edited by Liana D 2011-09-07 1:22 PM
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 1:23 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


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Location: Claremore, OK
THANKS SO MUCH TO EVERYONE !!!

I've got to get back to work !!!

Have a great week and ride smooth !!
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SKM
Reg. Dec 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 1:25 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Saint Stacey


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Liana D - 2011-09-07 12:20 PM
SKM - 2011-09-07 1:12 PM Thank you so much!  I will have my daughter read this.  I appreciate your help and what you said makes a lot of sense.   



The filly doesn't like much on her head.  What she is in now is a little sidepull/hackmore with short shanks. She has been tough to figure out when it comes to head gear.
Yes, I was guessing she was probably sensitive in the mouth. I think having a lot of forward motion is adding to the problem too. All I can suggest is lots of quiet time, getting her to relax and give to the bit, especially laterally. I would really work on bending her and softening right before I went in the arena. Try to make it a cue for her to relax. The more you convince her to relax in her neck and jaw, the softer she'll be.

We will try that. She tends to get jittery if you mess with her before a run which is why my daughter just sits there and keeps her quiet.  You have definatly given us some things to work on, some great ideas and we appreciate the help more than you probably realize. Thank you!
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Liana D
Reg. Sep 2008
Posted 2011-09-07 1:29 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Defense Attorney for The Horse


1000100252525
Location: Claremore, OK
SKM - 2011-09-07 1:25 PM

Liana D - 2011-09-07 12:20 PM
SKM - 2011-09-07 1:12 PM Thank you so much!  I will have my daughter read this.  I appreciate your help and what you said makes a lot of sense.   



The filly doesn't like much on her head.  What she is in now is a little sidepull/hackmore with short shanks. She has been tough to figure out when it comes to head gear.
Yes, I was guessing she was probably sensitive in the mouth. I think having a lot of forward motion is adding to the problem too. All I can suggest is lots of quiet time, getting her to relax and give to the bit, especially laterally. I would really work on bending her and softening right before I went in the arena. Try to make it a cue for her to relax. The more you convince her to relax in her neck and jaw, the softer she'll be.

We will try that. She tends to get jittery if you mess with her before a run which is why my daughter just sits there and keeps her quiet.  You have definatly given us some things to work on, some great ideas and we appreciate the help more than you probably realize. Thank you!

You might try looking at my reply to Richard Degnan's post. It's possible adrenalin would kick in and it would be counter productive, but you might give it a try. Good luck !
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geronabean
Reg. Sep 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 1:46 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


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 If you have a horse that is dealing with past demons where they were rushed some and now when picked up at a lope to bend a bit in one direction they panic some and stiffen with that pressure.. what is your favorite way to reassure them and get that softness back at a lope? (this horse is a finished reiner turning barrel horse).

I am not using spurs and am using a nice none offensive short shank mullen mouth pelham... seems to be working (direct pressure with a ring bit was not helping)... trying to do some spirals... SLOWLY getting some response.. having a dental done next week.... IMO tying around will worsen the issue plus it only happens with the pressure of speed... and I am keeping my hands low and very responsive to give to her give.

but perhaps you have a thing you might do that I haven't thought of?


Edited by geronabean 2011-09-07 1:53 PM
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Speedy Buckeye Girl
Reg. Jun 2010
Posted 2011-09-07 1:52 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon



Elite Veteran


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Location: "...way down south in the Everglades..."
Thanks for coming on!
I have a filly that's ready to be started on the pattern this fall.  However, for financial reasons I moved her to my home and we do not currently have an arena.  I planned on hauling to some local stuff on weekends and trying to teach her the pattern as we go.  Am I asking for a complete disaster?  I've never not had an arena and I'm a little bit lost but don't want to give up on such a nice prospect.   She's quite smart and I've been using trees and random objects as "barrels" for the walk and trot while we're at home.  I don't want to blow her up though by her thinking that everytime we leave the house it's barrels and speed, if that makes sense? 

 
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Gail
Reg. Sep 2003
Posted 2011-09-07 3:43 PM
Subject: RE: Back by popular demand Lianna Deweese Sept 7 Noon


Military family

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